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Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Lightroom: Lens Corrections & Color

Post 24


Series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®



Unusual and Unexpected

That's the definition of aberration. Chromatic aberration is when you see unexpected color in an image. It is also known as color fringing. Fringe is an appropriate term because the color concentrations usually happen along the edges of the subjects in the image. Scientifically, we are talking about light wavelengths and how that light passes through the lens of the camera. You will see chromatic aberration often in high-contrast lighting, fast moving objects and in water environments.



How about an image taken in water, looking towards a strong light source (the sun) with a moving subject?



This image has strong blue and yellow chromatic aberration. Can you see it?


Fringe Art


This image is also taken under water and the subject, some lovely coral, was moving with the water.

When you have an image with color fringing you want to correct, go to the Lens Corrections section in the Develop Module, and click on the Color tab.



First, enable the correction adjustments by checking the box by Remove Chromatic Aberration.

Adjust the slider bars for Amount and Purple Hue, or for the Amount and Green Hues. How much you adjust on either or both is completely up to the image's needs and your preference.


This one now has the yellow reduced most noticeably.

Choices at the Fringe Festival

Not sure what color or how much to adjust? Click on the eye dropper tool and hover over the color fringe area. 



You will see this box appear:


The colors in this box will change depending on which part of the image you hover over. Click on the color in your image and the adjustments are made automatically.


Next post: Lightroom Lens Corrections & Manual
  




These posts are part of a series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

Jennifer Apffel is a photographer with over a decade of experience in portrait, event, and product photography. She also does freelance graphic design and fine art. For more check out jenniferapffel.com, albaphotography.net or look for her on fineartamerica.com.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Lightroom: Lens Corrections & Manual


Post 25
Series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®


Ready For A Good Time?


That is, with Lightroom, of course. Let's test what the Manual section of Lightroom's Lens Corrections does. In the Lightroom Develop Module, open the Lens Correctionoptions by clicking on the arrow to the right, then select the Manual tab. Here you see Transform with these options underneath, accompanied by sliders:

Distortion, Vertical, Horizontal, Rotate, Scale, and Aspect



Here is what they do:

- Distortion




+Distortion


-Vertical


+ Vertical


- Horizontal


+ Horizontal
 

- Rotate


+ Rotate


- Scale


+ Scale


- Aspect


+ Aspect


 Crop & Chop

Under your Lightroom Transform options, you will see a box next to Constrain Crop. If you are left with white space around the edges after your desired manual corrections have been made, click this box. Your image will be cropped to eliminate that unwanted white space.

Under Constrain Crop is a little section for Lens Vignetting. We will cover this next time, because they go hand in hand.

Now, I had a blast playing with this. You? And I actually get to use this for work. Score!



 


Next Post: Lightroom Vignetting in Lens Corrections

These posts are part of a series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

Jennifer Apffel is a photographer with over a decade of experience in portrait, event, and product photography. She also does freelance graphic design and fine art. For more check out jenniferapffel.com, albaphotography.net or look for her on fineartamerica.com.

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