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Knity-Grity Details in the Metadata



Post 12
Series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

A Rose by Any Other Name…

This isn’t just a simple name-your-image-tool. Metadata is an ambiguous term for “data that describes data”. In Lightroom, metadata is the information you choose to attach to your images. This information can describe the image, claim ownership and copyright, and a whole lot more.

Saving Precious Time

You can save yourself a great deal of time by manually entering your metadata information, and saving it as a preset. All your photos have metadata attached to them, whether you specify it or not. Make sure the data attached to your images is the information you want to be there. If you post or share your images online, then having your metadata set will provide the copyright and pathway back to you, the owner of the image. 


Under Apply During Import, click on the arrows to the right of Metadata and select New.




What’s in the Data?

In Basic Info, make sure your name is attached to your images. If you want to use the rating tool, this can help you sort your images within Lightroom at a later point. Other information you can add in Camera Info is Commentary, GPS coordinates, Altitude and Direction. If I were shooting in the Andes Mountains, for example, this might be really fascinating information to record that I was facing west while shooting at ____ altitude at _____ at _________ latitude and longitude. (But I do tend to be a nerd that way. Shout out to my fellow nerds!)
Here is what your New Metadata Preset box looks like: 


IPTC What?

Wikipedia web definition of IPTC is:

“The International Press Telecommunications Council, based in London, United Kingdom, is a consortium of the world's major news agencies and news industry vendors.”

Yahoo’s Definition of IPTC data is:

IPTC data is a method of storing textual information in images defined by the International Press Telecommunications Council.”

I can’t stress enough the importance of what you choose as your IPTC content. This is a kind of marketing tool for your work, and it’s value is beyond explainable. If you want to know more, research The International Press Telecommunications Council.

IPTC Content is a brief written summary of the image, a newscode found at newscode.org, and the name of the person writing the photo description.

MINE. The Copyright

Copyrightis your name. Your images belong to you. Specifying this makes it so that permission is required for anyone to use your image. Copyright Status is either “unknown” or “copyrighted”. I recommend specifying that your image is copyrighted. Rights Usage Terms are “All rights reserved”. Copyright Info URL is your website. Once you have entered in all the information, (make sure you check the boxes to the right side of the information you want to include, and then click create). 

If you are prompted to do so, choose Save Current Settings as New Preset.

Want to go back and change your settings? Simply go back and click on Edit Presets.

Choose your Destination for saving copies of your images, and you are ready to move on to actually looking AT your images. But wait! There's more...



(Next Post: Comparisons Comparisons… Lightroom and Compare View)


These posts are part of a series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

Jennifer Apffel is a photographer with over a decade of experience in portrait, event, and product photography. She also does freelance graphic design and fine art. For more check out jenniferapffel.com, albaphotography.net, or look for her on fineartamerica.com.
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Comparisons: Lightroom and Compare View

Post 13
Series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®


Making the Cut in Compare View

In your Lightroom Library, go back to your bottom toolbar. On the left you see Grid view and Loupe view, which we talked about in Post 4. Next to Loupe view are two rectangles with X and Y in them. This is Compare View.



Compare view is especially helpful when you have taken several images of the same subject. Many times I have a bunch of images that have very little difference between them. For example, a portrait session may have the subject sitting in the same pose, but with different facial expressions. To decide which is the best choice, I flip through them with Compare View.

The Best of the Best: Select Image

Helpful note: after clicking on Compare View (or C on your keyboard), you still have the ability to zoom. You also have new options available to you. Choose the image you want to keep and compare others to. This will be your “Select” image on the left hand side. In the gallery, there will be a white diamond in the corner showing you this is your Select image. For a different Select image somewhere else in your catalog, click on the image you want in the bottom gallery (sometimes called the “filmstrip”).



Maybe This Image: The Candidate

On your right side is the “Candidate”. In the gallery, there will be a black diamond in the corner showing you this is your candidate image. Want to switch the two images with each other? Click the XY with reverse arrows at top and bottom.






Want to throw out the Select image and keep the Candidate image? Click here. Lightroom automatically pulls the next image for comparison.



Getting Choosey

To select a range of images, or more than two in a row, hold the shift key down while clicking on the first and last images. If you want to select more than two images that are not next to each other, hold the control key in Windows or the command key in Mac. If you want to de-select an image, hold the control key/command key and click on that image again. You will still be able to only see two images at a time in compare mode.



These left and right arrows switch the Candidate image and allow you to compare.



If you want to throw out the Select image and keep the Candidate image, click on “Make Select”.

Zoom Zoom

If you want to see the compare images in a larger view without zooming in and cropping part of you image view, you can clear out side and bottom panels by hitting the shift+tab keys. You can still zoom while in this no-panels viewing mode. Want to see the gallery still? Click on the arrow at the bottom.

Panning for Gold

While in zoom mode, you can “pan” images, or move the zoom section. To pan both images, click and hold the image while you move your mouse. To pan only one image and not the other, click on the lock image to unlock it. If you want to sync the images again, click the sync button.

Done and Ready to Start

Click DONE to exit compare view, and you will see only your Select image. Now you can work on your chosen image, and we will move on to the amazing capabilities of the Lightroom Develop module.

Next post: Introduction to the Lightroom Develop Module

These posts are part of a series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

Jennifer Apffel is a photographer with over a decade of experience in portrait, event, and product photography. She also does freelance graphic design and fine art. For more check out jenniferapffel.com, albaphotography.net, or look for her on fineartamerica.com.
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Lightroom: Lens Corrections & Color

Post 24


Series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®



Unusual and Unexpected

That's the definition of aberration. Chromatic aberration is when you see unexpected color in an image. It is also known as color fringing. Fringe is an appropriate term because the color concentrations usually happen along the edges of the subjects in the image. Scientifically, we are talking about light wavelengths and how that light passes through the lens of the camera. You will see chromatic aberration often in high-contrast lighting, fast moving objects and in water environments.



How about an image taken in water, looking towards a strong light source (the sun) with a moving subject?



This image has strong blue and yellow chromatic aberration. Can you see it?


Fringe Art


This image is also taken under water and the subject, some lovely coral, was moving with the water.

When you have an image with color fringing you want to correct, go to the Lens Corrections section in the Develop Module, and click on the Color tab.



First, enable the correction adjustments by checking the box by Remove Chromatic Aberration.

Adjust the slider bars for Amount and Purple Hue, or for the Amount and Green Hues. How much you adjust on either or both is completely up to the image's needs and your preference.


This one now has the yellow reduced most noticeably.

Choices at the Fringe Festival

Not sure what color or how much to adjust? Click on the eye dropper tool and hover over the color fringe area. 



You will see this box appear:


The colors in this box will change depending on which part of the image you hover over. Click on the color in your image and the adjustments are made automatically.


Next post: Lightroom Lens Corrections & Manual
  




These posts are part of a series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

Jennifer Apffel is a photographer with over a decade of experience in portrait, event, and product photography. She also does freelance graphic design and fine art. For more check out jenniferapffel.com, albaphotography.net or look for her on fineartamerica.com.

Lightroom: Lens Corrections & Manual


Post 25
Series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®


Ready For A Good Time?


That is, with Lightroom, of course. Let's test what the Manual section of Lightroom's Lens Corrections does. In the Lightroom Develop Module, open the Lens Correctionoptions by clicking on the arrow to the right, then select the Manual tab. Here you see Transform with these options underneath, accompanied by sliders:

Distortion, Vertical, Horizontal, Rotate, Scale, and Aspect



Here is what they do:

- Distortion




+Distortion


-Vertical


+ Vertical


- Horizontal


+ Horizontal
 

- Rotate


+ Rotate


- Scale


+ Scale


- Aspect


+ Aspect


 Crop & Chop

Under your Lightroom Transform options, you will see a box next to Constrain Crop. If you are left with white space around the edges after your desired manual corrections have been made, click this box. Your image will be cropped to eliminate that unwanted white space.

Under Constrain Crop is a little section for Lens Vignetting. We will cover this next time, because they go hand in hand.

Now, I had a blast playing with this. You? And I actually get to use this for work. Score!



 


Next Post: Lightroom Vignetting in Lens Corrections

These posts are part of a series: Introduction to Adobe Lightroom®

Jennifer Apffel is a photographer with over a decade of experience in portrait, event, and product photography. She also does freelance graphic design and fine art. For more check out jenniferapffel.com, albaphotography.net or look for her on fineartamerica.com.

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